Even gifted kids can have trouble with spelling and phonics

If you have a high ability child, don’t expect the academic road to always be smooth and straight. Dyslexia may keep a brilliant mind from understanding phonics and spelling rules.

This young man is as smart as he is handsome, but spelling rules were frustrating for him. Too many homework hours were spent trying to memorize a list of words in isolation. What was missing was the “why” of phonics patterns. More than once he complained that spelling made “no sense.”

When I was a classroom teacher, I told a series of stories that I made up about the Vowels, giving them human characteristics and a “voice” which represented either the long or short vowel sounds. I created a character named Mighty Magic E, complete with a red super hero cape, who helped Vowels say their name (the long sound), instead of their scared sound (the short sign) when they are followed by a consonant.

I recently sat with this young man and used my second book of stories to help him read words with R controlled Vowels. In addition, we went back to the first book and reviewed Mighty Magic E and how it changes the vowel sound. Until he read the book with me and acted out the interactions between vowels and other letters, he didn’t know what sounds the combinations of letters made.

These books are not intended for a child to read alone.

Each story in just a few pages. They can be acted out like a conversation between a vowel and a consonant who meet on a road. The stories reinforce reading from left to right, which I call a “one way street”.

It was rewarding to watch this young man learn the phonetic rules and begin to accurately predict the sounds that letters make in different combinations.?

Does your child struggle to spell or sound out words? These books can help beginning readers make the connection between letters and the sounds they make.

You can order them here!

Why Do Vowels Make Different Sounds? (Beginning Phonics) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1728660394/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_BXPNCb5RDGFX3

More Vowel Stories for Beginning Readers (Beginning Phonics) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1790725259/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_PYPNCbEPA1FJM

Recognizing Spatial Intelligence – Scientific American

Spatial intelligence is often overlooked but is key to understanding calculus and architectural 3D structures.

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
— Read on www.scientificamerican.com/article/recognizing-spatial-intel/

Disciplining Smart Kids | Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT

43 participants and attendees from 22 states, D.C., and 5 countries joined us this week at Global #gtchat Powered by TAGT on Twitter to discuss disciplining smart kids! So often, discipline is confused with punishment which should not be the intent. Discipline should serve as a teachable moment. Gifted children know when others are trying…
— Read on globalgtchatpoweredbytagt.wordpress.com/2018/11/23/disciplining-smart-kids/

A Gifted Child Journal

Do you have a child 8-18 who has trouble telling you what she/he thinks? Is your child going through the stage where he is trying to decide how he feels about different things? If your child can write in sentence, a journal may be an appropriate gift. This journal has guided prompts to respond to such as, ” Of what are you the most afraid?” Or “What makes you feel proud? It asks a lot of “why” questions, prompting your child to elaborate.

If your child hates to write, this journal won’t make him/her want to write. If they like to write, this can be a helpful place to put their thoughts and ideas on paper.

Brain science shows that you remember what you write on paper better than what you type on a keyboard. Give a journal as a gift that will be developmentally helpful for the gifted kid who is figuring things out. You can buy it here! Just click on the picture.

A Gifted Child Mom Journal

Do you keep a journal? Many moms keep a journal to track their own diet, business, or mental awareness goals. Journals are available online as well as in handy little hard copies to slip into your purse or diaper bag. Mom journals become the inspiration for new businesses, a diary of their hopes and dreams, and a documentation method for different parts of their busy lives.

Research studies are proving that you remember more when you write on paper rather than on an electronic device. No, really! Read one study for elementary age children here: http://iranarze.ir/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/E3172.pdf .

Here is a study on adults: https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/39983829/Sociological_insights_on_the_comparison_20151113-12886-s9zabv.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A&Expires=1541983482&Signature=ZRIFePl4akqYcVfugGSPR8UxNRo%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DSociological_insights_on_the_comparison.pdf

If the hyperlink doesn’t work, just copy and paste it in your browser. I don’t recommend things that are not backed by science.

I just published a guided journal for gifted child moms. It is a guided journal, which means it has some prompts to guide your thinking about how you nurture your gifted child’s intellectual and emotional development. In addition, it has some recommended reading on parenting gifted children. It has a list of books and a list of blogs. My hope is that you will read and reflect on your own parenting style. Write down your child’s behaviors and issues and how you dealt with them. Notice which strategies worked best, and which recommended strategies were not successful with your child. My hope is that it will make you a better Gifted Child Mom. You can buy a copy of it here: